Did you know?

  • The UK is proudly the largest producer and consumer of frozen peas in Europe Brits eat on average 9,000 peas per year
  • There are approximately 700 British pea farmers
  • Over 2 billion portions (80g) of peas are harvested annually 
  • Britain is 90% self-sufficient in pea production 
  • The majority of freshly frozen garden peas and petits pois are frozen within just two and a half hours of being picked, locking in all the nutrients.
  • The Latin name for peas is pisum sativum.

  • On average, everyone in Britain eats nearly 9,000 peas per year.
  • The world record for eating peas is held by Janet Harris of Sussex who, in 1984, ate 7175 peas one by one in 60 minutes using chopsticks!
  • Thick London fogs of the 19th and 20th centuries were dubbed 'pea-soupers' because of their density and green tinge.
  •  There are 35,000 hectares of peas grown in the UK each year, equivalent to about 70,000 football pitches. This produces about 160,000 tonnes of frozen peas - that's 2 billion 80-gram portions. 

  • The first peas were frozen by Clarence Birdseye who invented the 'plate froster' to preserve foods in the 1920's. 
  • Just one serving of freshly frozen garden peas and petits pois contains as much vitamin C as two large apples!Peas are said to give relief to ulcer pains in the stomach because they ‘use up’ stomach acids.
  • Peas are a good source of vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, thiamine (B1), iron and phosphorus.
  • They are rich in protein, carbohydrate and fibre and low in fat
  • A 100-calorie serving of peas contains more protein than a whole egg or tablespoon of peanut butter.

  • Peas are thought to have originated in Middle Asia and the central plateau of Ethiopia.
  • Fresh peas became popular in the 18th century when improved varieties were developed by English plant breeders. 
  • The world's first sweet tasting pea was developed in the 18th century by amateur plant breeder Thomas Edward Knight of Downton, near Salisbury, England.
  • Gregor Johann Mendel (1822-1884), an Austrian monk, worked with peas in laying the foundation of the modern science of genetics.
  • The oldest pea ever found was nearly 3,000 years old and discovered on the border of Burma and Thailand.
  • Peas were known to the Greeks and Romans (the Romans grew 37 different varieties at one point) and these early types were first mentioned in England after the Norman conquest.
  • The Italians are credited with breeding what became known as "piselli novelli" or new peas, the small peas most of us today call petits pois (little peas).